Thanks to the internet!

Open Culture is one of the great doorways to courses and information! For example:

 

When you dive into our collection of 1,300 Free Online Courses, you can begin an intellectual journey that can last for many months, if not years. The collection lets you drop into the classrooms of leading universities (like Stanford, Harvard, MIT and Oxford) and essentially audit their courses for free. You get to be a fly on the wall and soak up whatever knowledge you want. All you need is an internet connection and some free time on your hands.

Today, we’re featuring two courses taught by Professor Richard Bulliet at Columbia University, which will teach you the history of the world in 46 lectures. The first course, History of the World to 1500 CE (available on YouTube and iTunes Video, or fully streamable below) takes you from prehistoric times to 1500, the cusp of early modernity. The origins of agriculture; the Greek, Roman and Persian empires; the rise of Islam and Christian medieval kingdoms; transformations in Asia; and the Maritime revolution — they’re all covered here.

In the second course, History of the World Since 1500 CE (find it on YouTube, iTunes or embedded below), Bulliet focuses on the rise of colonialism in the Americas and India; historical developments in China, Japan and Korea; the Industrial Revolution; the Ottoman Empire; the emergence of Social Darwinism; and various key moments in 20th century history.

Bulliet helped write the popular textbook The Earth and its Peoples: A Global History, and it serves as the main textbook for the course. Above, we’re starting you off with Lecture 2, which moves from the Origins of Agriculture to the First River – Valley Civilizations, circa 8000-1500 B.C.E. The first lecture deals with methodological issues that underpin the course. All of the remaining lectures are available below.

Once you get the big picture with Professor Bulliet, don’t forget to visit our collection of Free Online History Courses, a subset of our big collection, 1,300 Free Online Courses from Top Universities.

 

In just war

Battle of the Bulge Memorial - Arlington Natio...

Battle of the Bulge Memorial – Arlington National Cemetery – 2013-08-24 (Photo credit: Tim Evanson)

Dear list members:

The Just War Newsletter is a new electronic newsletter published four times annually for those working in academia, the public service, and non-governmental sectors and for anyone whose work touches on the just war tradition and its related disciplines. Issue No. 2 has recently been published and can be viewed on our website:

http://thejustwarnewsletter.blogspot.ca/

Those wishing to receive this free publication by subscription, as well as those who wish to advertise an event, publication, or academic program in a future issue, should send a quick email to the following email address: 9msk@queensu.ca

Many thanks!

Mike Kocsis

9msk@queensu.ca

 

Foyle’s War

Cover of "Shane"

Cover of Shane

One way I have found to add pizzazz to the classroom experience is to show appropriate movies for analysis. It is easy to use movies to bring out the features of various ethical theories. One might, e.g., show Shane and compare it with High Noon to bring out the differences between consequentialism and a duty based deontological system. Or, build a thought experiment around a more recent film: Imagine it possible to develop a perfume that would bring about universal love when released on the world. Further imagine that to develop this perfume would require the murder of a dozen young women in order to extract their “essence”.  A dozen deaths to eliminate hatred among billions of people – the end of war and barbarism.  (Sound familiar? Perfume: The Story of a Murderer) Should we murder a dozen to save millions? Would a utilitarian ethic justify these murders? [Source]

Well I am retired now and do not have a captive audience to try films, but if I did I would certainly use the three part post war episodes of Foyle’s War. The moral questions raised in those episodes are interesting and fundamental. Those questions probe the nature of meta-ethics: is consequentialism the best approach to deciding what to do? Is there an absolute set of rules that should be followed? When theory and practice collide what to do? Does the end justify the means (always, sometimes, never) ? If truth is the first casualty in war is principle far behind?

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Remember Mal-U?

Thanks to wayback I can link to these pages thought to be lost . Nothing on the net is lost!

Malaspina University-College History

Stories of how Malaspina came to be

Introduction:

Chapter One: Early History
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Chapter Two: In the Hospital
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Chapter Three: A Site to See
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Chapter Four: Under One Umbrella
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Chapter Five: College and Community
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Malaspina’s history is published as an electronic document by the Media Relations & Publications department. The original work was produced as a “Challenge ’93” project and was researched and written by Brian Schmidt.

 

| Publisher: Marianne van Toor | Editor: Bob Lane |
| Researcher/Writer: Brian Schmidt |

Link to the complete document here.