Emotions

A new issue of Emotion Researcher (the newsletter for the International Society for Research on Emotion) is now available.

As well as serving as a newsletter for members of ISRE, Emotion Researcher acts as a permanent, expanding, online resource, featuring expert, cross-disciplinary discussions concerning fundamental aspects of emotion.

The latest issue focuses on emotion and empathy, with articles by Derek Matravers, Alexandra Main, and Jodi Halpern. It also includes an interview with James Averill; an article on emotion and moral judgement by Nina Strohminger; and a retrospective on the life and work of Jaak Panskepp, by Douglass Watt.

The new content is available on the Emotion Researcher website: emotionresearcher.com. Previous issues, featuring a range of interviews and articles, can also be accessed there.

Books!!


Canadians love their books. Canadians love their libraries!

Politicians crimp libraries at their peril. This year, a public outcry led Saskatchewan’s government to acknowledge that it was wrong to cut library budgets by 4.8 million Canadian dollars. Afterward, officials restored the flow of money. Similar protests last year led Newfoundland to suspend its library closings.

Here are some suggestions for recent books by Canadian authors. From the New York Times “Canada Letter”.

 


Speaking of dreams

In the recent post on history (in the comments) there is talk of dreams and dreaming. That subject has been a winner here on the Blog over the years.

 

Here are a few links:

  1. https://boblane.com/2017/03/31/descartes/
  2. https://boblane.com/2006/06/08/dreams-redux/
  3. https://boblane.com/2015/11/18/clemente-discussion/
  4. https://boblane.com/2016/09/18/ss-dreams/

JHAP

Bertrand Russell
Bertrand Russell (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Volume 5.7 of the Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy is now online, with full open access.

It features an article by Samuel Lebens entitled, “Russell and Bradley: Revisiting the Creation Narrative of Analytic Philosophy”. Here is an abstract:
According to Steward Candlish, Russell and Moore had misunderstood F. H. Bradley’s monism. According to Jonathan Schaffer, they had misunderstood monism more generally. A key thread of the creation narrative of analytic philosophy, according to which Russell and Moore successfully undermined monism to give rise to a new movement is, therefore, in doubt. In this paper, I defend the standard narrative against those who seek to revise it.

The issue also features a review of Greg Frost-Arnold’s Carnap, Tarski and Quine at Harvard: Conversations on Logic, Mathematics and Science, written by Henri Wagner.