Screenworks

Dear Colleagues,
We are delighted to announce the first entry in Screenworks Volume 11.1, Dr. Iakovos Panagopoulos’ Flickering Souls Set Alighthttps://doi.org/10.37186/swrks/11.1
Flickering Souls Set Alight is a visually arresting fiction film following the life of a Greek family during the toughest years of the financial crisis. With her husband on a life support machine, the film depicts Persephone’s financial and emotional struggles, drawing attention to a lack of support for people suffering from ALS. This practice-research enquiry asks how modernist techniques, such as Brechtian alienation, can comment on contemporary Greek social issues. Highlighting the cinema of Theo Angelopoulos, Andrei Tarkovsky and Abbas Kiarostami as references, Panagopoulos’ research statement details his production process through the lens of a total filmmaker approach and proposes a new wave of political cinema in Greece.
Volume 11.1 is an open “rolling” volume which means we are accepting practice-research submissions on any subject through to August 2021. More information and guidelines can be found online at our submissions page: http://screenworks.org.uk/submissions
Please feel free to get in touch directly if you have any questions about the journal or submission process.

Alex Nevill

Associate Editor of Screenworks

Dear Bob,

I hope this finds you well. I am contacting you on behalf of the East European Film Bulletin (www.eefb.org). (Go to the web site to find links for contact.)


As part of our Romanian focus of 2020, we are planning a special issue on architecture/urbanism/memory in Romanian cinema (see call for papers attached). 


We would be very grateful if you could share it through your network and/or on your social media platforms.


Best wishes from a sunny Paris,
Yann Kaci––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
Yann KaciEast European Film Bulletin

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Populism and Racial Injustice

A Gothic-Without-Borders Conference in March 2021, fully online, hosted by the Department of World Languages and Literatures (WLL) at Simon Fraser University (SFU), Vancouver, Canada, coordinated by the SFU Center for Educational Excellence (CEE), and co-sponsored by the International Gothic Association (IGA) and others

Plenary Speakers

Linnie Blake, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK

Mark Deggan, Simon Fraser University, Canada

Andrew Hock Soon Ng, Monash University, Malaysia

Maisha Wester, Indiana University, Bloomington, USA

 “In the first place, a blazing star or comet appeared for several months before the plague, as there did the year after another, a little before the fire. The old women …. remarked…that those two comets passed directly over the city, and that so very near the houses that it was plain they imported something peculiar to the city alone; that the comet before the pestilence was of a faint, dull, languid colour, and its motion very heavy, Solemn, and slow…and that, accordingly, one foretold a heavy judgement, slow but severe, terrible and frightful, as was the plague’.

Daniel Defoe, A Journal of the Plague Year 1665 (1722)

Photo by Matheus Bertelli on Pexels.com