Faith/faith

Read this review and consider faith:

William James on Ethics and Faith
Read the review at “metapsychology”!

Review – William James on Ethics and Faith
by Michael R. Slater
Cambridge University Press, 2009
Review by Bob Lane, MA
Mar 23rd 2010 (Volume 14, Issue 12)

Please excuse me if I use the “F” word often in this review. I realize that many people are afraid of that word and are disgusted by its frequent use in contemporary letters. Even tough-minded scientists like Jerry Coyne are quick to correct themselves if the “F” word sneaks out. In a recent Point of Inquiry podcast, Coyne, in talking about his book Why Evolution is True, says “most evolutionists take it [the evidence for evolution] on faith … well, not faith…”. He immediately corrects himself and restructures the sentence. It was as if he had used the other “f” word in a church or mosque. Faith is the “F” word that people either love or hate.

2 thoughts on “Faith/faith

    • The Church was a thousand years old before it definitively took a stand in favor of celibacy in the twelfth century at the Second Lateran Council held in 1139, when a rule was approved forbidding priests to marry. In 1563, the Council of Trent reaffirmed the tradition of celibacy.

      Several explanations have been offered for the decision of the Church to adopt celibacy. Barry University’s Ed Sunshine told Knight-Ridder that the policy was initiated to distinguish the clergy as a special group:”A celibate clergy became the paradigm of separation from the sinful world.” A.W. Richard Sipe, a former priest and author of Sex, Priests and Power: The Anatomy of Crisis (1995), told Knight-Ridder that the”question at the time was who is the final power — the king or the church. If [the church] could control a person’s sex life, it could control their money, their employment, their benefice.” Garry Wills suggested in Under God that the ban on marriage was adopted to lift the status of priests at a time when their authority was being challenged by nobles and others.

      Protestants early on took exception to celibacy, arguing that it promoted masturbation, homosexuality and illicit fornication. Martin Luther singled out masturbation as one of the gravest offenses likely to be committed by those who were celibate.”Nature never lets up,” Luther warned,”we are all driven to the secret sin. To say it crudely but honestly, if it doesn’t go into a woman, it goes into your shirt.”

      Source: https://historynewsnetwork.org/article/696

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