Fake News – updated

FAKE NEWS IS STILL WITH US.

In February we talked about Fake News, False News, TRUTH, and truth at the downtown library. Here is an outline of stuff and some links.

Definitions of “Fake News”:

BBC

The BBC defines fake news as false information deliberately circulated by hoax news sites to misinform, usually for political or commercial purposes… It is worth differentiating fake news from false news, a term sometimes used interchangeably by some politicians to dispute news reports with which they do not agree or which they dislike. Guardian

There has been much commentary about defining the phenomenon of fake news, with some commentators blurring the lines between completely false stories, farmed news and more difficult cases such as heavily spun or partially inaccurate news…

The Guardian readers’ editor has proposed the following draft definition – “’fake news’ means fictions deliberately fabricated and presented as non-fiction with intent to mislead recipients into treating fiction as fact or into doubting verifiable fact.”

If, as is increasingly happening, the term fake news becomes synonymous with the notion of flawed journalism a serious prospect threatens: the spread of doubt about whether truth itself can be approximated, the spread of doubt about whether actual events are fake.

ITN

The democratisation of information online – which has caused many to describe this as the Golden Age of Journalism – has also led to a situation where credible impartial news sources are placed on a par with hoax websites and hyperpartisan websites claiming opinion as fact.

In the past year – new websites have sprung up posting unverified and untrue information, which has been widely shared on social media.

It falls into several different types:

1)      Totally fake news sites – with completely false stories– e.g. “Pope Francis Shocks World, Endorses Donald Trump” – which received over 1,000,000 engagements on social media.

2)      Hyperpartisan sites that present comment as fact or use selective facts while ignoring other salient ones

3)      Sites which mix fact and fiction – without traditional editorial standards they publish some true stories and some fake stories which get widely shared. This may include misappropriation of content by third parties, which may distort the material to suit their political agendas

While the above encapsulates what ITN recognises as fake news the definition of the term is shifting and has now arguably been misappropriated to become a catch-all phrase for coverage you disagree with.

This term has been quite regularly applied by President Trump to mainstream media for articles that do adhere to journalistic standards and ethics – and which mainstream media would strongly contest is “proper” journalism. This sets a precedent for other organisations and governments to dismiss critical stories as fake.

Meanwhile, the Chinese government recently described reports of torture from a human rights activist as “fake news”. This demonstrates how the terms has become a method or strategy enabling those held to account not to engage with genuine news reports and instead dismissing media who question them by labelling their reports as “fake”.

The consistent misuse of the term fake news in turn dilutes and undermines the label when it is accurately applied to articles that publish falsehoods. It could be argued that a new term or label needs to be found – although this too risks misappropriation

Online course: https://iai.tv/iai-academy/courses/take/lectures?course=rhetoric-and-reality

http://callingbullshit.org/

 

Fight back! Sites to help in checking the veracity of memes, claims, etc.

Fake news2

 

Shakespeare and Swander

More about the UCSB prof who changed my life:

1940s – US Navy – Homer Swander

Clipping from the 1940s showing Swander’s concern for distinguishing between persons and ideas:

Always an activist for moral values.


The idea was to have a year-long ”Shakespeare celebration” – a unifying theme in the classroom and/or community. It was the idea of a Shakespeare scholar, Homer Swander of the University of California at Santa Barbara. He wanted to share his love of the Bard and his works in a new way.

Professor Swander and the Association for Creative Theater, Education, and Research (ACTER), of which he is director, planned the celebration to coincide with the arrival last year of a Washington-based exhibit of Shakespeare’s works and maps, books, and curios of Elizabethan life. Source.


Professor Swander and the Association for Creative Theater, Education, and Research (ACTER), of which he is director, planned the celebration to coincide with the arrival last year of a Washington-based exhibit of Shakespeare’s works and maps, books, and curios of Elizabethan life.

The exhibit, organized by the Folger Shakespeare Library, had toured six US cities in two years. It was not scheduled to visit Los Angeles, but Professor Swander determined to change that. After some persuasion and a timely $150,000 grant from the Times-Mirror Foundation, the exhibit opened at the Los Angeles Museum of Science and Industry last October. It was seen by over 130,000 children.

”I felt the exhibit would be incomplete without a live theater and community response,” said Professor Swander. The idea snowballed into a year-long cornucopia of plays, lectures, concerts, and fairs called ”Good Will.” Source.

Dr. Swander died February 18, 2018 at the age of 96. He touched a lot of lives.