Camus, Philosophe: To Return to Our Beginnings

As regular readers know Camus was a big influence on me. But even I was surprised by the number of times I have posted on or about Camus on this Blog!

This link will give you an idea of those many posts.

Matthew Sharpe has a new book out with a review on NDPR.

Matthew Sharpe, Camus, Philosophe: To Return to Our Beginnings, Brill, 2015, 446pp., $194.00 (hbk), ISBN 9789004302334.
Reviewed by David Stegall, Clemson University

 

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Matthew Sharpe begins with the celebratory confession that “Camus’ voice has been so much a part of my inner life, like many millions of others’, that I don’t know where my own sensibilities begin that were not taken from what I took to be his.” (xiii) Sharpe situates his text within the ongoing Camus renaissance, a renaissance that Sharpe traces to four causes: The publication in 1994 of Camus’ Le Premier Homme, a true literary event; the fall of Stalinism; the war on terror; and the decline of the hegemony of post-modernism and post-structuralism with academia. And so while Camus had never declined in popularity as a writer, Camus as philosopher and as resource for philosophical inquiry has been on the rise since the 1990s. This renaissance arguably goes beyond the sources cited by Sharpe and should also include recent texts such as Elizabeth Hawes’ Camus: A Romance, and Kamel Daoud’s The Meursault Investigation [the latter published to near universal acclaim — ‘near universal’ in that Daoud was also put under a fatwa for his text]. And as Sharpe reminds us, an additional ‘fifth spur’ to Camus scholarship was that 2013 marked the centennial of Camus’ birth and occasioned several conferences and texts. In tracing and being a part of said renaissance, Sharpe produces an exhaustive survey of the recent secondary literature on Camus, heavily footnoted and annotated.

Read the review.

One thought on “Camus, Philosophe: To Return to Our Beginnings

  1. Pingback: SS: Camus’s masterpiece as a graphic novel | Episyllogism

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