History lesson–USA

English: The Bellamy salute is the salute desc...

English: The Bellamy salute is the salute described by Francis Bellamy (1855–1931) to accompany the American Pledge of Allegiance, which he had authored. During the period when it was used with the Pledge of Allegiance, it was sometimes known as the “flag salute”. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Pledge of Allegiance was written in August 1892 by the socialist minister Francis Bellamy (1855-1931). It was originally published in The Youth’s Companion on September 8, 1892. Bellamy had hoped that the pledge would be used by citizens in any country.

In its original form it read:

“I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”

In 1923, the words, “the Flag of the United States of America” were added. At this time it read:

“I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”

In 1954, in response to the Communist threat of the times, President Eisenhower encouraged Congress to add the words “under God,” creating the 31-word pledge we say today. Bellamy’s daughter objected to this alteration. Today it reads:

“I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”

Section 4 of the Flag Code states:

The Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag: “I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”, should be rendered by standing at attention facing the flag with the right hand over the heart. When not in uniform men should remove any non-religious headdress with their right hand and hold it at the left shoulder, the hand being over the heart. Persons in uniform should remain silent, face the flag, and render the military salute.”

The original Bellamy salute, first described in 1892 by Francis Bellamy, who authored the original Pledge, began with a military salute, and after reciting the words “to the flag,” the arm was extended toward the flag.

At a signal from the Principal the pupils, in ordered ranks, hands to the side, face the Flag. Another signal is given; every pupil gives the flag the military salute — right hand lifted, palm downward, to a line with the forehead and close to it. Standing thus, all repeat together, slowly, “I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands; one Nation indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all.” At the words, “to my Flag,” the right hand is extended gracefully, palm upward, toward the Flag, and remains in this gesture till the end of the affirmation; whereupon all hands immediately drop to the side.

The Youth’s Companion, 1892

Shortly thereafter, the pledge was begun with the right hand over the heart, and after reciting “to the Flag,” the arm was extended toward the Flag, palm-down.

In World War II, the salute too much resembled the Nazi salute, so it was changed to keep the right hand over the heart throughout.

SOURCE

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3 thoughts on “History lesson–USA

  1. BOSTON (AP) — A lawyer for an atheist family had asked the highest court in Massachusetts to ban the practice of reciting the pledge of allegiance in state public schools.
    In arguments before the Supreme Judicial Court on Wednesday, a lawyer for the Acton family argued that the words ‘‘under God’’ in the pledge discriminates against atheist students.
    The lawyer argued that the reference defines patriotism as someone who believes in God.
    Lawyers for the school district and another family who want to keep the pledge in schools, said the pledge is voluntary and students can leave out the reference to God or choose not to recite it.
    Last year, a state judge found that the rights of the atheists were not violated by the words ‘‘under God.’’
    The family appealed the ruling.
    from boston.com

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  2. I was 12 years old when the Pledge of Allegiance was changed in 1954. It made a huge impact on me, because the addition of “under God” was uncomfortable for me – and still is almost 60 years later. Not everyone believes the way Christians do, so religion, especially, doesn’t belong in America’s public schools. Some people don’t understand that “God” is “religion.” I always felt that “under God” was just one step closer to saying “under Jesus,” which would exclude and marginalize America’s Jews, Hindus, and Muslims. But the U.S. is considered a “Christian country” more than it’s considered “everyone’s country.” According to Pew Research, 78.4% of U.S. adults are Christian; 4.7% are other religions; 16.1% are unaffiliated; and 8.0% refused to answer or “don’t know.”

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  3. Pingback: Just stay quiet: Poster hoax about the Pledge of Allegiance | Millard Fillmore's Bathtub

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