Top stories from “Columbia Journalism Review”

English: New York, New York. Newsroom of the N...
English: New York, New York. Newsroom of the New York Times newspaper. Reporters and rewrite men writing stories, and waiting to be sent out. Rewrite man in background gets the story on the phone from reporter outside. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Thursday, October 19

Our most popular stories this week, along with editors’ picks:

  1. Behind the story BuzzFeed, Daily Beast, NYT and more didn’t want to publish 
    A cautionary tale for journalists.
  2. Trump might be in serious trouble for his NBC tweets 
    This time, he went too far.
  3. Reporter uncovers years of shocking allegations involving teacher
    “Oh my god,” reporter Bethany Barnes remembers thinking.
  4. Making media literacy great again
    “There is so much bullshit. We are drowning in it.”
  5. The story behind “one of the best reported pieces of the year” 
    The blockbuster investigation you do not want to miss.
  6. “She identified herself as a reporter. He then walked behind her and punched her in the side of the head”
    Alarming physical attacks on journalists.

 

 

Submissions? Ephemeris, Undergraduate Journal of Philosophy

Call for undergraduate papers

Ephemeris is an undergraduate journal of philosophy that is student-run and dedicated to publishing exceptional undergraduate writing grounded in the distinct value and interest of the philosophical endeavor.

Contributions: Contributions are solicited in all areas of the philosophical discipline. Contributions should take the form of essay, article, or short note. Review articles are welcome. Please include a short abstract describing the thesis of the paper and main conclusions.

ATTENTION – SPECIAL SECTION:

​ ​

Ephemeris 2018 wIll include a special section on the topic whether it is justifiable in a democracy to implement public policy motivated by personal conviction with an eye to such topics as whether religious citizens and politicians may vote or legislate their religious convictions, whether the state may subsidize religious schools and related topics. We will publish the three best papers we receive in this field.

 Submission: Be sure to include your name, postal and email addresses, and the university or college in which you are enrolled as an undergraduate.

Please send your work and any correspondence to <Ephemeris.ephemeris.uc@gmail.com>. You should receive a confirmation of receipt shortly thereafter. 

​Submission Deadline: January 15th, 2018.

For more information about Ephemeris and submission guidelines, please visit our website at <http://punzel.org/Ephemeris>.

Politics and Religion

Motivating Political Participation?

Does religion spur persons to engage in such nonviolent political activities as signing petitions, joining in boycotts, participating in demonstrations, taking part in unofficial strikes, occupying buildings and factories, or voting and membership in political parties?

A large cross-national study recently published in Religion, State, and Society examines the relationship between religion and political activity. Researchers at the University of Kansas examined data that covered over three decades in order to look at the influence that various religious factors had on political participation. The lead researcher, commenting on the new study, reckons from the data that “religious beliefs, by themselves, do not suffice to motivate individuals to act politically.” Thus: “it is incorrect to infer political behavior from religious beliefs alone.”

The study itself informs us that while religion may well influence individuals’ opinions on hot-button issues (take same-sex marriage, abortion as examples), personal religiosity doesn’t necessarily propel persons to political participation.  Rather, it interacts with secular configurations and pressures to encourage or deter individuals from engaging with the political world. The study abstract, in summarizing the research, indicates that individuals become more likely to engage in political activity of the types examined due to their affiliation with others, whether it be membership in religious organizations or belonging to other voluntary associations of a secular nature.

Read a summary and interpretation at:
https://phys.org/news/2017-10-religious-beliefs-dont-people-political.html